Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Today on Banknote of the Day we are going to see a whole lot of Ghana Banknotes , some banknotes are in used condition some are in close to UNC. The design and the color of the Banknotes are excellent , It gives the Tribute to there Leaders.

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Checkout the Video of Ghana Banknotes here

 

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes

Ghana Cedis Banknotes


Belgian Congo 10 Francs 1955-1959

Front: Soldier wearing fez. Back: Young antelope. Watermark: Head of a giraffe. Main colour: Grey-blue. Signatures: (as depicted)
Horaeck (Le Premier-Directeur, De Eerste-Directeur); Hector-Jules Martin (Le Gouverneur, De Gouverneur, 17 Jun 1954 – 3 Oct 1960).
Artist: Unknown. Engraver: Unknown. Printing method: Intaglio. Issuer: Banque Centrale du Congo Belge et du Ruanda-Urundi.
Date of Issue: 15-Jan-1955 (1955-1959). Withdrawn from circulation: Unknown. Material: Cotton paper. Printer: Waterlow & Sons
Limited, Londres (W&S).

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgium Congo Francs Banknote

Belgian Congo – 20 franks 1957 scarce used currency note


The year 2015 marks a centenary after the Chilembwe uprising against imperial Britain – an activity that is believed to have influenced, in some way, Marcus Garvey. Reverend John Chilembwe was born circa 1870 in the then ‘nameless’ enclave that later became British Central Africa before mutating into Nyasaland (land of the lake), now Malawi. In 1892, initiative led him to knock on the door of the radical missionary Joseph Booth, whose famous dictum was ‘Africa for Africans’.

Malawi 20 Kwacha John Chilembwe

In 1897, Chilembwe and Booth, headed for the United States of America, via London and Liverpool. In the US, Chilembwe was encouraged by African Americans to part with the now penniless Booth. Chilembwe, with the help of the Negro Baptist Convention, attended the Virginia Theological College. The failure of the Reconstruction period and the reaction of the Baptists to the Jim Crow laws would have an impact on Chilembwe. In the US, he also met other future African leaders including John Dube, who later became president of South Africa Native Congress, later the African National Congress (ANC).

In 1900, an ordained Chilembwe was back in Malawi, with the backing of the National Baptist Convention. He was a new man and very keen to show it, drawing complaints of ‘natives living beyond their station’ from the settler community. He soon became the vocal mouthpiece of the disfranchised Africans, from women’s rights to equality based on Christian values, from the virtues of educating the African to concerns over land tenure. In 1903, when Africans were sent by the British to fight the Ya Asantewa in present Ghana, Chilembwe complained loudly.

In 1859, famed Scottish missionary David Livingstone ‘discovered’ Lake Malawi and the east African slave trade. Back home in Britain, he campaigned for the introduction of Christianity and formal commerce to counter slavery. Early attempts resulted in disaster as the first missionaries out of Oxford and Cambridge ran into trouble against some Yao chiefs, then slave agents of the Swahili traders.

Attempts were made again after the much publicised burial of Livingstone at Westminster Abbey, resulting in the establishment, in 1876, of Blantyre (now Malawi’s commercial city), a tribute to Livingstone’s birth place. Closely following on the missionaries’ heels were businessmen and speculators and, before long, the alienation of land through mainly nefarious means.

Chilembwe bought land and set up his industrial mission in Blantyre’s neighbouring district of Chiladzulo, adjacent to the vast Bruce Estates, owned by none other than Livingstone’s own daughter Anne and run by William Jervis Livingstone, a distant relation, and a man who was to embody for Chilembwe everything that was wrong with the white settlers. For Jervis, Chilembwe was the archetypical ‘native above his station’. The laborers at the Bruce Estate, mostly of Yao and Nguru stock, the latter having migrated from present Mozambique after fleeing famine and harsh Portuguese rule, looked to Chilembwe for a patron figure.

Malawi 20 Kwacha John Chilembwe

Chilembwe accused Livingstone of, among other things, burning his churches and schools. When the colonial government turned a deaf ear, Chilembwe is reported to have suggested taking matters in his own hands.

By 1913, Chilembwe was in a tight corner: funding was hard to come by, he owed money for his very impressive cathedral, his gun licence for commercial ivory hunting was revoked, the famine of 1913 pushed more Africans towards him for help, and his poor health (asthma and failing eyesight) and the death of his daughter compounded his burdens. But the proverbial straw was the start of the Great War in August 1914 which saw his audience decrease as Africans were conscripted in large numbers to fight against German East Africa (now Tanzania). In November 1914, Chilembwe penned a scathing letter admonishing the government:

…In times of peace, everything for Europeans only…But in time of war [we] are needed to share hardships and shed blood in equality…

On Saturday 23 January 1915 he started an uprising. Chilembwe plotted to kill all white men in the protectorate, save for a few missionaries sympathetic to his cause, to bring about a new order in the region. The first casualty was Jervis Livingstone, his severed head a prized trophy by Chilembwe’s men. Others were sent to Blantyre–in the true fashion of John Brown of Harper’s Ferry–to break into the armoury and steal guns and ammunition. This mission was a failure of sorts with the supposed leader, John Gray Kufa, deserting and an accidental alarm being raised by Chilembwe’s men. Legend has it that Chilembwe preached the next day’s church service with the head of Livingstone next to the pulpit where he is reputed to have said the words: ‘Let us strike a blow and die for Africa’.

A few skirmishes with government and volunteer forces ensued but, by Tuesday 26 January, his whole mission had been abandoned. His impressive cathedral was then demolished with explosives. The uprising was quelled by 3 February 1915 when its leader was shot while trying to cross into Mozambique. In the aftermath, his fellow conspirators were either hanged or shot on a firing line.

The uprising, though short-lived, left an indelible mark. George Shepperson, University of Edinburgh professor and foremost scholar of Chilembwe, later summarised the uprising thus:

[His] ideas may have been utopian…borne their format in action dictated by despairing frustration. But at their heart was a solid matter of fact element that was constructively forward looking, and kept for the most part within the bounds of practical, if remote, possibility.

Since Nyasalanders had no myths like those of the old Ghana to inspire communal confidence, said Shepperson, Chilembwe’s name could be utilized. In 1958, Kamuzu Banda, Malawi’s first president, inserted himself in the Chilembwe narrative as the one prophetized about by Chilembwe himself to free Malawi from white rule. In 1994, Bakili Muluzi, Kamuzu’s successor, inserted Chilembwe on all bank notes. Surprisingly, not much has been done by the current Malawian government in the 100th year of his uprising. Still, to most Malawians, Chilembwe’s memory lives on as a symbol of courage and sacrifice.

Post Credits : africacountry.com


Romania first issued a polymer note in 1999 and by late 2001 became the third country after Australia and New Zealand to fully convert to polymer with notes of 2.000, 10.000, 50.000, 100.000 and 500.000 Lei. On 5 December, 2003 a light blue 1.000.000 Lei note appeared to complement this already colourful series.

Its theme is the arts and features a portrait of playwright Ion Luca Caragiale who lived from 1852 to 1912. One of Romania’s foremost playwrights, Caragiale had a checkered career. Commencing work as a journalist he obviously enjoyed the arts and devoted his spare time to writing comedies and dramas which were widely acclaimed.

His works did not support him and held the senior positions with the State. In 1901 he is accused of plagiarism and whilst acquitted a stigma seems to stick. Doors close on him and Caragiale sees out his days in self imposed exile in Berlin.

A bloom of the violet (other polymers also feature flowers) and theatrical masques, one of them depicting comedy, complete the main design features on the front of this note.

The former National Theatre in Bucharest, a statue of Caragalie and the masque of tragedy are the primary design elements of the back.

For Romania’s highest denomination, it is no surprise that sophisticated security features are utilised.

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day - Romanian Polymer banknotes

Banknotes of the Day – Romanian Polymer banknotes


Sweden 5 Kronor  The Sveriges Riksbank issued Swedish Krona banknotes in 10 different denominations, including this 5 Swedish Kronor banknote (King Gustaf Vasa). They are part of the withdrawn Swedish Krona banknotes series. The Sveriges Riksbank started issuing these 5 Swedish Krona banknotes in 1965. They were withdrawn from circulation in 1998.

The note of 5 fem kronor depicts the portrait of Gustav Vasa, King of Sweden. Printed on the five Swedish Krona bill is the text ‘Sveriges Riksbank’.

You Can buy this Banknote from our store 

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

Banknote of the Day: Sweden 5 Kronor (King Gustaf Vasa)

This banknotes are Extremely Popular among Collectors, The Banknote Color and Artwork looks amazing 5 Kronor next issue will be great and Swedens banknotes all look amazing. Banknote has more of Blue Color , and its size is smaller then other usual banknotes


This is part of a Special Series of 0 Euro Souvenir notes authorised by the European Central Bank printed on the same paper as Euro notes with the same security features as shown, Watermark, Security strip and Features visible under UV, Unique Collectors items, limited amount printed for major tourist attractions in Portugal. See scans under UltraViolet(Black light) revealing fluorescent security features and micro fibres.

Banknote of the Day: 100 Years of Fatima Apparitions Portugal 0 Euro

Banknote of the Day: 100 Years of Fatima Apparitions Portugal 0 Euro

Banknote of the Day: 100 Years of Fatima Apparitions Portugal 0 Euro

Banknote of the Day: 100 Years of Fatima Apparitions Portugal 0 Euro

 


The Banco Central de Bolivia has issued the new 100-bolivianos note on 15 January 2019, as part of the new family of banknotes. The new notes are printed by Oberthur Fiduciare SAS.

The front of the beautiful new note shows Juana Azurduy De Padilla, Alejo Calatayud, Antonio José de Sucre and the Casa de la Moneda on the front. The back of the note shows the Arcoiris Falls, the heliconia rostrata and the blue-throated macaw.


 Fiji 7’s note is very beautiful with its blue color and unique denomination. Fun fact: Under UV light the medals around the players necks become visible and other objects come to life! 

Reserve Bank of Fiji has unveiled a new 7-dollar note and 50-cent coin commemorating Fiji Rugby 7s gold medal win at the 2016 Summer Olympics (XXXI) held in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil from 5 August to 21 August 2016.

Banknote of the Day: Fiji 7 Dollars Rugby World Cup

Banknote of the Day: Fiji 7 Dollars Rugby World Cup

Despite the odd denomination, the note is legal tender. Two million notes were printed by Oberthur Fiduciaire and one million coins were struck by the Royal Canadian Mint. The notes and coins were introduced into circulation on 21 April 2017.

Banknote of the Day: Fiji 7 Dollars Rugby World Cup

Banknote of the Day: Fiji 7 Dollars Rugby World Cup

Blue. Front (vertical): English text; Fijian flag; Olympic coach Ben Ryan sitting on Sigatoka Sand Dunes; Olympic captain Osea Kolinisau running with ball; gold medal and RBF logo in OVI; coat of arms. Back: English text; Fiji Rugby 7s Gold Olympians with Prime Minister Josaia Voreqe Bainimarama and team officials; domodomo; bank logo. 2-mm wide STARsheen windowed security thread with demetalized FIJI 7s GOLD OLYMPIANS. Watermark: Savenaca Rawaca running with ball. Printer: (Oberthur Fiduciaire). 140 x 67 mm.
a. No date. Sig. 4. Prefix AU. Intro: 21.04.2017.


Everyone has a hobby. Trond Larsen’s is photography.

As the Rapid Assessment Program director at Conservation International, Larsen spends his days organizing international teams of scientists to find and document wildlife in far-flung locales. His camera goes with him to the wild, and his photos — predominantly of the animals he encounters in the field — have appeared everywhere from National Geographic to The New Yorker.

But Larsen can claim one photographic achievement that few on Earth can rival: One of his photos is on money. A shot that Larsen captured of a small, rarely seen frog was recently selected to grace a banknote in Madagascar.

This is the unlikely story of how a scientist’s zeal to find a frog “paid off.”

It started with a workshop — and a desire to sight-see.

“We were in Madagascar for meetings around a project we were doing,” said Rachel Neugarten, director of priority-setting at Conservation International. “So we had a workshop, and then a few of us organized a field trip for those who wanted to stay to try to see a little bit of Madagascar.”

The group, including Neugarten, Larsen and a few other staff, found a guide willing to take them through Ranomafana National Park, in the southeastern part of the island. Their mission for that day: to help Larsen find a tiny frog known of the genus Mantella.

Mantella frogs, of which there are more than a dozen species, are endemic to the island of Madagascar — meaning they live nowhere else on Earth. Small and brightly colored, they are reminiscent of their more famous South American cousins, the poison dart frogs.

“I was searching for this species because I really wanted to observe and photograph them,” Larsen said. “I told everyone in the group, ‘I’m not leaving until I find a mantella.’ ”

It’s an intensity that any breed of enthusiast, from birdwatchers to trainspotters, can understand.

“It’s been one of his ‘bucket list’ species that he’s been wanting to see his whole life,” Neugarten said.

The challenge: finding a tiny animal that does not want to be found.

“They tend to have very narrow distribution, with several species across Madagascar,” Larsen said. The species he was after, he said, was not endangered but it is hard to find, typically hiding under logs.

Fortunately, the team had an able guide.

“The guide knew exactly where this frog was,” Neugarten said.

Needless to say, it isn’t always so. Larsen’s work to find and document wildlife has taken him places few humans have ever seen. But this time? No bug-bitten treks through thick rainforest. No grueling canoe trips upriver. No hiking through miles of rugged, remote terrain. This time, the object of his search was just there, a short distance off the side of a road.

“We had to drive through one of the local communities to a little wetland area,” Neugarten said. “The guide hopped out of the car, walked a few yards in and came back with one of these frogs. He knew exactly where they were and how to find them.”

Moments later, a glimpse of the rare critter he came to see: Mantella baroni, not much larger than an adult’s thumb. Glistening and vibrant, its bright neon-green front legs and tiger-striped rear legs contrasted with the deep, dark black of its body.

Larsen, needless to say, was thrilled.

“At this moment, Trond is, like, beside himself, and he sets up this photo like a professional, and he’s taking pictures and having this out-of-body experience,” Neugarten said. “And the rest of us are just beside ourselves laughing because it’s a beautiful frog, but none of us has this connection to it that he does.”

Larsen managed to get within inches of the frog, who let him take several close-ups before hopping back into the undergrowth.

Given the importance of photography in nature conservation, it’s no surprise that a scientist would carry a camera around. But Larsen has taken his nature photography to a level few other researchers can match — and he is almost completely self-taught.

“The chance to artistically capture the beauty of [wildlife] is just really appealing,” he said. “I started to play around when I got my first SLR (camera), and I would bring a camera every time I was doing field work.”

“I took some pretty terrible shots at first, but you learn, and I started overlapping with professional photographers in the field and learned a lot of tricks from those guys.”

In 2017, Larsen was part of a small team of researchers selected to travel to a sensational archaeological find in Honduras. The site, known locally as “City of the Monkey God,” lay hidden for centuries within a concealed valley in the Mosquitia rainforest; its location remains a secret. The team’s perilous expedition to survey the area’s wildlife was chronicled in a story published earlier this year in The New Yorker— illustrated, naturally, by Larsen’s photos of the region’s rare amphibians and venomous snakes.

After his work trip to Madagascar, Larsen uploaded his frog shots to Conservation International’s in-house photo database and forgot about them.

Two years later, Larsen received an email. It was from Conservation International’s Madagascar office.

“They wrote me and said, basically, ‘Hey, the government’s interested in using your photo for a new banknote, would you be willing to let them use it?’ ”

The country’s previous series of banknotes had been in circulation for about a decade, according to Secura Monde, a consulting company for the currency industry, when the government decided in 2016 to refresh them.

The theme for the new series: “the riches of Madagascar.” Whom better to ask than a conservation group?

“When the government decided to create new banknotes, the Central Bank asked me to share some ideas related to nature,” said Sahondra Rajoelina, Conservation International Madagascar’s country director.

Rajoelina’s team sent along a few options, including Larsen’s frog. A signed agreement granted the government the right to use the photo — Larsen said he was happy to give it freely for their use.

The diminutive amphibian suits the small-change 100-ariary bill, which is worth about 3 U.S. cents. But this means Larsen’s shot will be well-circulated in a country where nearly 80 percent of the population lives on less than US$ 2 a day.

“It is going to be seen a lot,” he said.

As for his photography, Larsen continues to bring his camera with him to the field — not for the recognition, but for science.

“My research is first, of course, but you can always make time for photos.”


Chennai Coin Society(CCS) Conducts its 3rd Coin Fair for 3 Consecutive Days at Aruna Palace Saligramam, Chennai, There was Mixed Audience of Dealers, Collectors and Hobbiest, We from Banknotecoinstamp.com had our Dealers stall here, Here are some Images from the Exhibition

Chennai Coin Society 2019 Expo Video
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair
Chennai Coin Society 2019 Coin Fair