A commemorative 20-zloty bank note will be issued by the National Bank of Poland on Aug. 31 in honor of the 100th anniversary of the nation regaining its independence, as the Second Polish Republic, from the German, Austrian, and Russian empires in 1918.

The announcement was made on July 6. Up to 50,000 notes will be printed by the Polska Wytwórnia Papierów Wartosciowych S.A. (Polish Security Printing Works) in Warsaw. Its dimensions will be 150 millimeters by 77 millimeters or 5.9 inches by 3 inches, larger than then 126-millimeter by 63-millimeter size of the regular 20-zloty note, which will continue to circulate.

Each note’s face value is the U.S. equivalent of about $5.42.

The face of the note is dominated by a facing portrait of the revolutionary, statesman, and national hero Józef Piłsudski, with his chin resting on his hand. He served as chief of state of the new republic from its inception until 1922. To his right is the badge of the Polish Military Organization. The cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta is in the center, while the badge of Poland’s World War I 1st Legion Brigade is at the left above the watermark.

Poland’s red and white flag spans most of the reverse side. To its left is a legionary eagle holding an Amazonian shield in its talons with the words RZECZPOSPOLITA POLSKA (Republic of Poland) above.

This is Poland’s tenth commemorative bank note. The first, a 50-zloty note for Pope John Paul II, was issued in 2006. That one, and three others, 20-zloty notes for the 100th anniversary of Marie Curie’s Nobel Prize, the 200th anniversary of the birth of Frédéric Chopin, and 300th anniversary of the coronation of the Image of Our Lady of Czestochowa, are still available at the bank’s website, as will be the new issue

Independence

On 31 August 2018, Narodowy Bank Polski is putting into circulation a collector note “Independence”, with the face value of 20 zł.

source : www.coinworld.com


A group of locals, engaged in reconstruction of an old temple, found a copper pot full of antique silver coins dating back to 13th century, from a pit they had dug up in Kathur village in Uttarakhand’s Pauri district on July 21, district officials said on Friday.

The pot, containing 329 coins weighing nearly four kg, was found when the ground was being dug to construct the main gate for the Bhairav Temple in the village, gram pradhan Shravan Thapaliyal said.

Thapaliyal handed over the coins to district magistrate on Friday.

13th century coins found during digging in Uttarakhand

13th century coins found during digging in Uttarakhand

Experts will soon ascertain the age and value of the coins, Ashish Kumar, assistant director, Archeological Survey of India (ASI), Dehradun said. He, however, added that prima facie, the coins appear to be from the Mughal era, dating between the 13th and 16th centuries. They sport inscriptions in Arabic.

“Since the department is facing a paucity of funds and technical staff, we will seek help from Government of India and HNB Garhwal Central University to carry out further excavation at the site,” the ASI official said.

District magistrate Sushil Kumar said the temple premises and adjoining areas may be dug further with a recommendation to the Centre for further research. He also asked ASI officials and the local administration to keep an eye on the area.

Kumar had asked the sub-divisional magistrate of Srinagar, MD Joshi, and the ASI to carry out a physical verification of the site on Thursday after learning about the June 21 discovery.

However, before the team could reach the site, the village head handed over the container and the coins to additional district magistrate Ramji Sharan Sharma.

Sharma said 293 of the coins found are circular in shape while 38 are rectangular and they weigh 3,785 grams. He added that while the copper container had oxidized, the coins were in good condition.

Professor Rakesh Bhatt of the department of archaeology in Garhwal University, said kings of the Himalayan regions from 13th to 16th Century used to live here, He added that these rulers used to carry out transactions with the currency or coins manufactured by Mughals and Persians.

source : https://www.hindustantimes.com/


The use of 3D magnetic ink is among the new security elements incorporated in the two denominations of a new series of banknotes put into circulation on Friday to mark His Majesty the King’s 66th birthday on July 28, the Bank of Thailand (BOT) announced.

The 500-baht and 1,000-baht notes are printed with Optically Variable Magnetic Ink (OVMI) to improve security and prevent counterfeiting. They are part of the new Series 17 banknotes. (see photo below)

The BoT announcement said use of OVMI produces three dimensional effects when looked at from different angles and combine with other features that make them easy to identify and create unreproducible effects.

The front of both banknotes feature a portrait of His Majesty the King dressed in a Royal Thai Air Force uniform. The back of the 500-baht banknote features a portrait of King Prajadhipok (King Rama VII) and King Ananda Mahidol (King Rama VIII) as the main picture. The main picture on the back of the 1,000-baht banknote is a portrait of King Bhumibol Adulyadej (King Rama IX), along with a portrait of HM the King. Small squares can also be noticed on the 500-baht note, and circles can be seen on the 1,000-baht note. Their colours switch between gold and green. The public can obtain the new series banknotes from commercial banks and financial institutions from today onwards. The BOT said the printing of the Series 17 notes was approved by the King in March and the first series of new banknotes featuring His Majesty in three denominations — 20, 50 and 100 baht — were launched on Chakri Memorial Day, April 6.

The 500-baht and 1,000-baht-denominated banknotes, with the front side depicting His Majesty King Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun, put into circulation on July 28, 2018 – His Majesty’s 66th…

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Hong Kong just gave residents a peek into its new banknotes yesterday (July 24), but one of the bill designs is already being mocked for its resemblance to “hell money,” which Chinese people burn for their deceased loved ones.

HSBC, Standard Chartered, and Bank of China spent three years working with the monetary authority to each design five new notes. In addition to preventing counterfeiting, the new bills are centered around a few themes to promote Hong Kong’s culture and sights, such as dim sum ($20 notes), the city’s Unesco Global Geopark ($500), and Cantonese opera ($100). It’s the last one that has drawn mockery.

Some people say they feel a little unnerved by Bank of China’s version of the $100 note, which features a female Cantonese opera performer, because of its likeness to paper money (link in Chinese) meant for use in the afterlife.

“The design is very scary. One should spend it right after receiving it. I don’t dare to bring it home,” wrote one on Facebook. “The design looks like a cooperation with the ghost bank,” said someone else (links in Chinese) on the social-media site.

 

The new bills will be put into circulation in the fourth quarter this year. The last time Hong Kong issued new designs of banknotes was in 2010.

The Hong Kong Monetary Authority (HKMA), and the three note-issuing banks (NIBs) (Standard Chartered Bank (Hong Kong) Limited, Bank of China (Hong Kong) Limited and The Hongkong and Shanghai Banking Corporation Limited) announce the issue of the 2018 new series Hong Kong banknotes at a press conference in Hong Kong, July 24, 2018. Hong Kong’s new banknotes will have six advanced security features to prevent counterfeiting, and will showcase the city’s rich natural and cultural heritage. (Photo: China News Service/Zhang Wei)

 


A farmer Vaddula Satyanarayana Reddy asked his farm labourer Pondugula Ramanarayana Reddy to dig the area for laying water pipe in a field, and to their surprise, they unearthed a pot of 17th-century gold coins from a field. It is a copper vessel with 30 gold coins.

Later Archaeologists from Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) confirmed that the gold coins were in circulation between 1633 and 1646 in the Vijayanagara Empire. Recently in June this year, the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI) has unearthed the remains of a chariot and other antique items that date back to ‘Bronze Age’ (2000-1800 BC), in a small village in Uttar Pradesh.

“It is shocking to find such antique from an ancient civilization in this area. Many royal tombs have also been found during excavation. Whatever has been found so far seems to be 4,000 years old which is approximately 2000-1800 BC, We will make arrangements for its preservation.” ASI officials said.


National Level coin exhibition was held in Chennai , on this day various Dealers and Hobbiest had addressed this occasion, Ancient Coins of India, World Banknotes and Art Materials where on Display, Many Hobbiest had come to see the Exhibition as well as School childrens it was an exciting event here is the Images from the Coin Expo.

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018

Chennai Coin Society coin fair 2018


The Reserve Bank of India will shortly issue ₹ 100 denomination banknotes in the Mahatma Gandhi (New) Series, bearing signature of Dr. Urjit R. Patel, Governor, Reserve Bank of India. The new denomination has Motif of “RANI KI VAV” on the reverse, depicting the country’s cultural heritage. The base colour of the note is Lavender. The note has other designs, geometric patterns aligning with the overall colour scheme, both at the obverse and reverse. Dimension of the banknote will be 66 mm × 142 mm.

All the banknotes in the denomination of ₹ 100/- issued by the Reserve Bank in the earlier series will continue to be legal tender.

As is normal, when a new design of banknote is introduced, printing and supply of these notes for distribution to public through the banking channel will gradually increase.

The image and salient features of ₹100 denomination banknotes in the Mahatma Gandhi (New) Series are as under:

India new 100 rupees

India new 100 rupees

India new 100 rupees

ii. Salient Features
Obverse (Front)
1. See through register with denominational numeral 100
2. Latent image with denominational numeral 100
3. Denominational numeral १०० in Devnagari
4. Portrait of Mahatma Gandhi at the centre
5. Micro letters ‘RBI’, ‘भारत’, ‘India’ and ‘100’
6. Windowed security thread with inscriptions ‘भारत and RBI with colour shift ’ ;
Colour of the thread changes from green to blue when the note is tilted
7. Guarantee Clause, Governor’s signature with Promise Clause and RBI
emblem towards right of Mahatma Gandhi portrait
8. Ashoka Pillar emblem on the right
9. Mahatma Gandhi portrait and electrotype (100) watermarks
10. Number panel with numerals in ascending font on the top left side and bottom
right side
11. For visually impaired intaglio or raised printing of Mahatma Gandhi portrait,
Ashoka Pillar emblem, raised triangular identification mark with micro-text 100,
four angular bleed lines both on the right and left sides
Reverse (Back)
12. Year of printing of the note on the left
13. Swachh Bharat logo with slogan
14. Language panel
15. Motif of RANI KI VAV
16. Denominational numeral १०० in Devnagari