Bank of Thailand plans to introduce the 17th series of notes. The fronts feature the new king, Maha Vajiralongkorn Bodindradebayavarangkun, and the backs features two kings in order of reign, along with images of memorable royal duties. The three lower denominations will be introduced 6 April 2018, followed by the two larger denominations on 28 July 2018.

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family

Thailand new banknote family


If the new transitional justice legislation requires it, symbols of authoritarian rule such as effigies of President Chiang Kai-shek could be removed from the country’s banknotes and coins, new Central Bank Governor Yang Chin-long (楊金龍) said Thursday.

The government is preparing to form a Transitional Justice Committee, with one of its tasks taking a closer look at remnants of the Martial Law era, in particular the presence of Chiang statues on school campuses and on government land.

If the law demanded that such symbols were also removed from currency, then the Central Bank would of course respect the law, Yang told lawmakers during a question-and-answer session Thursday morning.

The cost of a complete redesign was estimated at NT$50 billion (US$1.7 billion), the Chinese-language United Daily News reported, but Yang emphasized that banknotes showing mountains, animals and sports scenes would not have to be withdrawn.

The Central Bank chief, who took office late last month, denied he was doing things differently from his predecessor, Perng Fai-nan (彭淮南), who ran the bank for 20 years. The institution’s leadership had already agreed on the measures before Perng’s departure, Yang said.

Chiang’s effigy still features on the rarely seen NT$200 banknote, and on the NT$1, NT$5 and NT$10 coins.


Payton Lindeman, 13, sat behind his ancient coin collection Sunday afternoon at the Front Range Coin Club’s coin show at the Boulder County Fairgrounds in Longmont.

Lindeman said he got into coin collecting because his grandfather participated in the hobby. But Lindeman, from Broomfield, was drawn to collecting ancient coins because they offer a glimpse into history.

He opened up the glass case and plucked out an encapsulated silver denarius from the ancient Roman Empire with an image of the god Apollo on one side.

“I just love the history behind these things. Like each coin has its own story,” Lindeman said. “It’s just amazing that they’ve lasted this long, too. Like people are digging four grams of metal out of the ground thousands of years later and these were used by ancient people.”

Coin collectors gather in Longmont to trade wares

Coin collectors gather in Longmont to trade wares

Lindeman said that he and his grandfather are running their own small business out of his home, buying and selling rare coins on eBay. He says his collection will probably fund his college education in a few years. After that, he plans to still collect coins as a hobby or pursue coin collecting as a career.

The Front Range Coin Club holds two coin shows per year; the next will be on Oct. 6 and 7, show chairman Ken Davis said.

Coin collectors gather in Longmont to trade wares

Coin collectors gather in Longmont to trade wares

Davis said that a big reason for holding the shows is to getting younger generations of people interested in the hobby of coin collecting.

Children who came to the coin show on Sunday received fake paper money they could use to bid on a special youth auction that included items meant to get someone started in coin collecting.

Brian Manning, of Lafayette, said the youth auction was a big reason he and his three kids like to go to the club’s show, which had free admission.

Coin collecting is a family tradition for Manning that he hopes his children will continue, he said.

“It’s something I used to do with my dad that I passed down to my kids and I hope my kids keep it going and pass it down to their kids one day,” Manning said. “It’s just a fun way to spend some time with the kids.”

Manning’s 14-year-old son Connor was looking to complete his set of Mercury dimes, which were struck by the U.S. Mint from 1916 to 1945. Isabelle, 11, was on the hunt for just the right wheat penny to fit into her collection, while her little sister Angelica, 9, collects Buffalo nickels.

Meanwhile, 91-year-old Bill M. — who declined to give his full name out of fear his collection would be stolen — sat at his table trying to sell of most of his coin collection that he has been building since 1960.

While Bill was trying to sell off most of his collection, he was still on the search for an 1893 Morgan silver dollar minted in Philadelphia that was “about uncirculated,” a designation for a coin that has very little wear and tear.

Bill already has an 1893 silver dollar minted in Philadelphia, but it has been graded and encapsulated by a third-party and he was looking for a “raw” coin that he could add to his set of rare silver dollars. Such coins go for about $411.


Whether a modern quarter displaying a U.S. national park or a rare, hand-hammered Greek denarius dating back to 250 A.D., history is woven throughout the process and story of all coins, tokens and currencies, according to Monte Mensing, president of the Springfield Coin Club.

“Most coin and currency collectors are history freaks. I know I’m a history freak,” Mensing said. “But history is completely connected with the stories and evolution of the world’s money.”

Springfield’s 63rd annual Coin, Currency and Token Show brought collectors and prospective buyers to the Holiday Inn in the Gateway area on Saturday and Sunday, where collectors exhibited their vast treasures of ancient and modern money while engaging and explaining the backstory of each piece.

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

The history side of the hobby is free, but coin collecting is a little more expensive, Mensing said, referring to the fact that some pieces in the show were selling for $20,000.

“It’s a lot, but true coin collectors do it,” he said.

Mensing, who displayed just a small portion of his lifelong collection, said he began collecting coins at age 9 after hearing about a penny that was worth $90 and decided he needed to “get his hands on it.”

“I liked history already, and when I was looking for that penny I fell into coin collecting,” he said. “And I sold one of those same pennies for $1,900 last week.

His focus on coin collecting swayed only once.

“There was this horrible time in junior high when we all became interested in girls,” he said with a laugh. “Besides that, I’ve never stopped.”

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Among his collection, Mensing displayed a heavy, bronze coin that “was worth a number of people’s lives” when it was created 2,300 years ago in Rome. Now, he has priced the rare piece at $1,000.

“There were so few of these coins, and existing in the time and place that it did, it has to have touched many famous hands,” he said.

He also featured currency from 1899 to 1901 that displayed Native American symbols — a bison, a black eagle and an Indian chief — that were part of an Americana series in which the government was recognizing contributions to the United States by Native Americans.

Phil Fields, another longtime numismatist, displayed a range of pieces that also offered glimpses into Oregon’s history.

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Fields, who said he has been collecting coins since 1960, shared an Oregon trail half-dollar coin featuring a Native American standing in front of a U.S. map on one side and an ox-drawn covered wagon heading toward the setting sun on the other. Made only between 1926 and 1939, the half-dollar piece now is worth at least $150, according to Fields.

Fields and Mensing both displayed fractional currency; with an appearance of miniature dollar bills, the fractional currency bills represent 3, 5, 10, 15, 25 and 50 cents.

“It was the Fractional Currency Act of 1861 that led to these,” Fields said. “During the Civil War, the government needed all of the copper it could get for weaponry and bullets, so they issued these series of fractional currency to use paper instead.”

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

Collectors share the histories behind rare coins at Springfield trade show

At other tables, collectors exhibited everything from Eugene-based tokens to a Queen Victoria silver jubilee and a handful of exceedingly rare poker chips. One collector featured iconic Disney dollars.

“I’m definitely one of the few people who specializes in Disney dollars,” said Terry Woodward, who displayed currency featuring numerous Disney characters and themes.

Woodward said the standout of his collection is a special anniversary edition Disney $50 bill made in 2005 to commemorate Disneyland’s 50th anniversary. The bill, which features colorful confetti and Mickey Mouse looking into a mirror reflecting an original image of himself, is one of only 500 ever made, and one of only 100 that were signed by the designer himself, according to Woodward.

“Now, this is worth $2,500,” he said, explaining also that Disney since has stopped making Disney dollars.

Collecting coins, tokens and currency might seem to be a lost hobby in the age of technology, Mensing said, but collectors and attendees at the annual show demonstrated their unwavering passion for the art.

The Springfield Coin Club meets at 7 p.m. the third Monday of each month at Putters, 1156 Highway 99. For more information about the Springfield club as well as others around Oregon, visit oregoncoinclubs.org .

Blog Article Credits: rigesterguard.com


Old paper banknotes, featuring a portrait of Charles Darwin, must be spent by 1 March, after which shops will no longer have to accept them

Old paper £10 notes will go out of circulation by the end of today, after which they will cease to be legal tender in shops.

From Friday 2 March shops will no longer be required to accept the paper banknotes that feature a portrait of Charles Darwin.

New plastic £10 notes depicting Jane Austen were introduced in September 2017.

The Bank of England recently estimated that around £2bn worth of old tenners were still in circulation.

After the deadline, people can exchange old paper notes by posting them or delivering them in person to the Bank of England in central London. The bank said it would accept the old notes indefinitely.

People may also be able to exchange the old note at a local bank or post office but there is no obligation to accept them after the deadline.

The new £10 note is the second to be printed on a plastic polymer, which the bank has said is cleaner, safer and more hard-wearing than the traditional cotton paper it will replace. The plastic fiver, featuring Winston Churchill, entered circulation in September 2016.

The new polymer notes are said to be significantly harder to forge.

When the design of the new £10 was first unveiled in July last year it was praised by members of the blind and visually impaired community for its tactile features.

Raised dots, similar to braille characters, on the left-hand side of the note and fine raised lines on the right, help those who cannot see to differentiate it from notes of other denominations.

A new polymer £20 banknote, featuring artist JMW Turner, is due to be issued in 2020. Bank of England governor Mark Carney said in October that there were no plans to make a new £50 note.



Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018 There was 3 days Numismatic exhibition at Shikshakara Bhavan Bangalore . Lot of collectors and Dealers had put up there stall and Many Hobbiest visited the Occasion there was also live floor auctions going on .. We banknotecoinstamp.com put up a stall here it was a good time here are some Photographs from the Exhibition

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018

Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018Marudhar Arts Bangalore Numismatic Exhibition 2018