A THREE thousand year old hoard of Broze Age gold discovered last year in Urswick has been declared treasure.

At a treasure inquest held today (24) at Barrow Town Hall the story behind the discovery of the precious collection unfolded. In April 2017 metal detectorists John Rigg and Darren Fine unearthed an extraordinary piece of ancient Furness history. A gold bracelet, three golden lock rings and a piece of a copper cauldron dating back three thousand years have shed like on what life was like in south Cumbria for those living almost three millennia ago.

Presiding over the inquest, assistant coroner Paul O’Donnell, said: “Clearly the find of such an item in Urswick opens up a new line of in inquiry into Bronze Age settlements this far north west. This is of significant interest to archaeologists and historians alike.”

The items found were a pennacular bracelet 68mm in diameter, and three golden lock rings, which are only 34mm in diameter. Experts believe they date from between 1000BC to 800BC. Historians believe lock rings may have been used as earrings or to decorate strands of hair. Their use has also been associated with wealthy and important members of Bronze Age communities.

Cauldron fragment. The length is 27mm, the width is 31mm thickness 15mm and the weight 31.33g.
Photo: Portable Antiques Scheme
19/01/18

Under the Treasure Act 1996 any item of gold or silver or groups of coins more than 300 years old have to be reported to authorities within 14 days of their discovery. An inquest will then be held to determine if they are treasure, and if so, they can be acquired by the British Museum for its collection. Pieces are valued with their amount being split 50/50 between the land owner and those who found it.


The National Numismatic Collection, consisting of more than 16,000 coins and medals, is the largest and most diverse found on the island. Heritage Malta’s visitors can view a vast selection of these coins at the National Numismatic Exhibition at the National Museum of Archaeology.

“This valuable collection shows us and reminds us of our country’s eventful and rich past, especially due to its strategic position”,said Minister for Justice, Culture and Local Government Owen Bonnici. “It is therefore a good thing that such a collection is accessible to everyone.”

This collection is continuously being increased with acquisitions and donations. The exhibition is divided periodically and includes the Carthaginians, the Romans, the Medieval millennium, the Order of St John, the French, and the British. Another section includes medals, dies, proofs and accessories, while the minting process is also explained through audiovisual means.

Heritage Malta’s Chairperson Dr Joe Buttigieg said that, “We should also think of those who have contributed to this collection. I have to mention the considerable donation of Prof Salvatore Lugi Pisani in 1899 and Dr Tancred Gouder as well, an ex-archaeology curator and director of the Museum Department who had this collection at heart and made sure to exhibit and increase it through the years.” There was a need for this exhibition to be permanently on show, and it is now accessible to the general public regularly for the first time, as before this exhibition was only accessible via appointment.

Coins started being struck around 650 BC. They provide physical evidence not only ofmonetary values, but also of other information such as the political import of different periods. Until 1972, Malta mainly used coinage of the various foreign powers occupying the islands. In that year, Malta issued its own currency for the first time. Heritage Malta also displays a number of coins in other museums such as the Domus Romana, the Archaeology Museum in Gozo, and Fort St Elmo. A selection from this collection will eventually be on show in the Grand Master’s Palace as part of the major project of rehabilitation co-financed by the European Union.

Parliamentary Secretary for Consumer Protection and Valletta 2018 was also present for the launch of this exhibition.

The opening hours of the National Museum of Archaeology are from 9.00hrs to17.00hrs until February, and from 9.00hrs to 18.00hrs from March until December. For more information visit www.heritagemalta.org

Original Post Credits: http://www.independent.com.mt


5 dobras (US$0.20)
Purple. Front: Portuguese text; Acraea insularis butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; Rei Amador embossed on clear window. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; Rei Amador embossed on clear window; butterflies; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Musaranho-fingui (Crocidura thomensis) São Tomé shrew. No security thread. Watermark (shadow image): None. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 130 x 67 mm. Polymer (Safeguard).
a. 21 de Outubro de 2016. Sig. 7. Prefix AA. Intro: 01.01.2018.

10 dobras (US$0.45)
Red. Front: Portuguese text; Acraea niobe butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; Rei Amador embossed on clear window. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; Rei Amador embossed on clear window; butterflies; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Tluqui-Sun-Dêçu (Prinia molleri) São Tomé prinia bird perched on branch. No security thread. Watermark (shadow image): None. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 135 x 67 mm. Pol

20 dobras (US$0.90)
Green. Front: Portuguese text; Charaxes barnsi butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; butterfly as registration device. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; butterfly; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Rã de S. Tomé (Hyperolius thomensis) Sao Tome giant treefrog clutching branch. Red-to-green windowed security thread with demetalized BCSTP. Watermark: Rei Amador and electrotype butterfly. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 140 x 67 mm.
a. 21 de Outubro de 2016. Sig. 7. Prefix AC. Intro: 01.01.2018.

50 dobras (US$2.20)
Brown. Front: Portuguese text; Charaxes lemosi butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; butterfly as registration device. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; butterfly; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Tchintchintchólò (Ploceus sanctithomae) São Tomé weaver perched on branch. Red-to-green windowed security thread with demetalized BCSTP. Watermark: Rei Amador and electrotype butterfly. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 145 x 67 mm.
a. 21 de Outubro de 2016. Sig. 7. Prefix AD. Intro: 01.01.2018.

100 dobras (US$4.40)
Green. Front: Portuguese text; Charaxes odysseus butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; holographic patch; butterfly as registration device. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; butterfly; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Macaco de S. Tomé (Cercophithecus mona) Mona monkey on branch. Red-to-green windowed security thread with demetalized BCSTP. Watermark: Rei Amador and electrotype butterfly. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 150 x 67 mm.
a. 21 de Outubro de 2016. Sig. 7. Prefix AE. Intro: 01.01.2018.

200 dobras (US$8.80)
Dark red. Front: Portuguese text; Charaxes defulvata butterfly; coat of arms; Banco Central headquarters building in São Tomé; holographic patch; butterfly as registration device. Back: Portuguese text; stylized cocoa pod; butterfly; map of Sao Tome and Principe; Chibi-ficha (Anabathmis hartlaubii) Príncipe sunbird perched on branch. Red-to-green windowed security thread with demetalized BCSTP. Watermark: Rei Amador and electrotype butterfly. Printer: (Thomas De La Rue). 155 x 67 mm.
a. 21 de Outubro de 2016. Sig. 7. Prefix AF. Intro: 01.01.2018.




The Central Bank of the Solomon Islands (CBSI) is pleased to announce the availability of the world’s first-ever legal tender gold coin note.

This extremely thin coin note is produced in 0.5 g fine .999 gold and is measured at 90 x 43 mm. The making of this gold coin note renders the product as very delicate in appearance. Advanced minting techniques has enabled high-quality striking of the coin with extraordinary attention to detail.

Currently CBSI is very active in the international numismatic market and has been implementing a currency reform policy that saw the introduction of new sets of coins and banknotes into circulation back in 2012. Today, the Bank continues to gain recognition from avid collectors and buyers worldwide.

This latest project involves CBSI and the World Coin Association and MDM Group, a company based in Germany who have been in the numismatic business for more than 100 years. According to CBSI, this particular project involves stepping out of the traditional coin design and into a hybrid-concept production design that combines both the banknote and coinage characteristics.

Chief Manager of the Currency and Banking Operations Department (CBOD) at CBSI, Mr. Daniel Haridi, explained that the project, although exciting, does come with its own risks as well.

Haridi explained that CBSI appreciated the opportunity to collaborate with well-established and reputable numismatic organizations like MDM in the promotion of highly innovative numismatic products. He added that though small and isolated from the market, technology has enabled the Central Bank to participate in exciting projects that promises good results for all stakeholders.

“CBSI currently enjoys good branding of its numismatic coin products,” Haridi highlighted.

“The effigy which in this case is The Queen’s effigy is a highly priced effigy on the market and Solomon Islands has rights to use Her Majesty the Queen’s effigy, with prior approval from Buckingham palace, of course,” Haridi explained.

“I believe MDM recognizes the importance of this partnership, especially in this new coin project that uses Her Majesty’s effigy and this may be regarded as stepping out of the traditional coin/note boundary.”

CBSI believes MDM’s promotion of this product to its market in Europe and the world over can enhance the country’s profile overseas. This can influence sales of numismatic coins and, therefore an increase in revenue stream for CBSI and the country from such numismatic business engagements.

“As a country, the partnership relationship with MDM on a relatively new product would position Solomon Islands as a country that embraces innovation and change despite its size and location,” Haridi finally highlighted.

According to CBOD officials, each coin note is professionally packed and set in a protective clear square capsule. At the moment the maximum mintage is limited to 20, 000 pieces only.

In terms of the design, on the reverse, the Effigy of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II is depicted in profile and is framed by graphic elements.

The reverse features symbols of the most important world currencies, rotating around planet Earth. In the background, symbols of the financial world are displayed.

Interested coin collectors and individuals can contact CBSI numismatic officer, Ms. Patricia Salah, to place their order for the coin note.



Explorers have been filmed discovering a plethora of treasures believed to be from the wreckage of an 1838 steamboat which exploded off the coast of North Carolina.

As the swipe metal detectors over the wreckage, they can then be seen digging into the ground and blowing sand out the way to reveal large coins, a razor, tools and other valuables from the sunken boat.

It is believed the wreck could be from the Pulaski which was ferrying politicians and wealthy families in the spring of 1838.

It was travelling from Savannah, Georgia to Baltimore, Maryland and had made a stop in Charleston, South Carolina when it exploded at around 11pm.

It is believed 100 people – half of the passengers on board – died.

But now two groups, Blue Water Ventures International and Endurance Exploration, are working to recover the valuables from the shipwreck.

The coins that have been found so far are dated no later than 1836 and include early United States silver issues and Spanish silver coins from the late 1700s.

President of BWVI said: “We are looking forward to these next months, as our team continues to recover this shipwreck, bringing pieces of our past back to the present.”

Although the wreckage has not been confirmed to be that of the Pulaski – the date on the coins gives a strong indication it could be.

Doctor Joseph Dchwarzer from the North Carolina Maritime Museum told the Charlotte Observer: “Finding the Pulaski is a big deal.

“Saying something was the ‘Titanic of its time’ is an overworked metaphore… But I will say it’s one of the more significant diasters in American maritime history.”

It is hoped the ship’s bell and numbering on its boilers will soon be found which will give confirmation over the wreckage.


1968: The year that changed everything

The year of 1968 saw a world in turmoil over the war in Vietnam, a growing anti-war movement and two assassinations in the United States. William T. Gibbs reports in the issue’s cover feature that as collectors in the United States turned to their collections, they found much that was new.

Mint marks were being returned to U.S. coins after a three-year hiatus, and Proof sets were once again available, with a new hard plastic case containing Proof coins struck at a different Mint for the first time. Read the article exclusive to the digital and print issues of the February 2018 issue of Coin World.

Exploring the world through coins depicting explorers

Forget Christopher Columbus, writes Jeff Starck in his feature leading the World Coins section. Other famous explorers are featured on coins from around the world, charting the famous discoveries as mankind ventured into new oceans and new lands.

James Cook, Henry the Navigator, and Ferdinand Magellan all appear prominently on coins issued by many nations. Read more in the digital and print editions of the February monthly issue.

It’s an emergency! New notes hit streets in hours

When Franklin Roosevelt took office in 1933, he and the new Congress took a number of steps to set America back on track to economic stability and prosperity. One major problem was a shortage of cash; banks had been emptied of their dollars and new currency was needed.

An emergency issue of small-size Federal Reserve Bank notes was approved and the first notes were released into circulation a day after the act was signed into law. How could the government release new notes in such a short period of time? Learn how in Paul Gilkes’ feature leading the Paper Money section of the February issue.

Fine Style: What does it mean?

“It’s often said that ‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder,’ an observation that applies well to the style of ancient coins,” writes David Vagi in his “Ancients Today” column, found only in the February 2018 issue.

He adds: “Since individual artists created the dies used to strike ancient coins, it is difficult to compare the styles of coins with accuracy and consistency. Indeed, it is necessary to have a great deal of experience observing the full range of artistic styles encountered on ancient coins.”

Post original Author credits : www.coinworld.com